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Archive for September, 2012

"Corners"

Bettye Harwell

"Nightscape"

Amsterdam acrylics on canvas

Two studies using acrylics that have a creamy consistency and vibrant colors. The smaller image, Nightscape, shows the way the color adhered to the gesso underpainting.  It is not as noticeable  on the painting itself. The artist can make choices to leave the texture or sand the canvas and repaint it. (more…)

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Great design.

Warren Stokes Art

Maze-ing Maze 17

Maze 17:  I haven’t quit the challenge I just had a set back.  When I started thinking how to tackle the year-long maze it was more difficult than I originally thought.  So I decided to take a week or two to think about how I want to make it work.

The maze was a recreation of one of the mazes from the 365 project.  I did this one on canvas.  I like the look of the mazes when I leave the natural white space.

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ROBERTO ALBORGHETTI

“COLORS OF AN APOCALYPSE

THE DECOMPOSED PUBLICITY POSTERS”

SHOW 2012

ROBERTO ALBORGHETTI AT ALDOBRANDESCA FORTRESS (XIII CENTURY)

MOUNT AMIATA, TUSCANY – ITALY

The Official Poster

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 “COLORS OF AN APOCALYPSE

THE DECOMPOSED PUBLICITY POSTERS”

SHOW 2012

The Playbill

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COLORS OF AN APOCALYPSE

THE DECOMPOSED PUBLICITY POSTERS”

SHOW 2012

The Flyer about Limited-Edition Silk Scarves  On Dislay at “Colors Of An Apocalypse” Show

 

 

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For all interested in phtography and curating.

Nikki G Ph.D.

A Generous Medium: Photography at Wellesley 1972-2012 at the Davis Museum at Wellesley College will enthrall photography enthusiasts, collectors, scholars, and curators alike. As a contributor to the exhibition catalogue, admittedly, I am biased. For me, the most exciting part of the exhibition as a contributing writer included the excitement of seeing all the other photographs together on display. The curators arranged the works, quasi-19th century salon-style, by order of accession date, which provides a chronology of tastes of sorts. Those tastes were shaped by the Davis Museum–the donors, the museum directors, or past and present faculty members available to offer expertise–at any given moment over the last four decades. I wrote on two photographs included in the show: Ellen Gallagher’s Abu Simbel (2005-06) and Radcliffe Bailey’s Echo (2011). Both images were acquired by the Davis Museum in 2011 under the leadership of the Davis’ current director, the Ruth Gordon Shapiro ’37 DirectorLisa…

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A Day's Outing

End of Summer

Now that the nights are cool and the mornings are foggy, it is time to put away the signs of summer. It seemed the heat would never end.

Who knew?

Cleaning out of a drawer had a hidden treasure – my

handwritten poems Narcissus, Hibiscus and Mandrake. With them are the research notes on the relationship of the flowers and trees used as the theme. And, as if that was not enough, notes from the Writers’ Conference my daughter and I attended.

I flew on People’s Express from Nashville to the hub in Newark. The daughter was in graduate school at Rutgers. Such convenience. We flew from Newark to Michigan for the conference.

Cesar Chavez & Audre Lord at Plaza 16 Public g...

Cesar Chavez & Audre Lord at Plaza 16 Public gallery at 16th St BART (Photo credit: Steve Rhodes)

Audre Lord, the outstanding poet, was one of those featured. Manuscript in hand we absorbed as much as we could and returned home the route we came by. Just ending a long marriage, I felt such a euphoria of independence (which had been lacking).

Read poems at

http://narcissushibiscusmandrake.wordpress.com

And Now

Just recently there was news that an unknown novel written by a Harlem Renaissance writer had been authenticated. It was found by a graduate student looking through some unopened boxes. Will my manuscript and notes have the same fate and be written about in the New York Times?

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First Year BloggingSeptember, 2011 – 2012

English: The logo of the blogging software Wor...

English: The logo of the blogging software WordPress. Deutsch: WordPress Logo 中文: WordPress Logo (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

My blogging tutor, the eldest daughter, had no idea the Pandora’s Box she opened. Reviewing the past year, I am so appreciative of her guidance and all of you who write and follow. Who knew there were so many talented and caring people online!
What has this meant to me?

1 – New personal relationships with creative thinkers worldwide. Amazing sharing keeps me coming up with fresh ideas to write about.
2 – Taking time to reflect on expanding subjects. Just reading the posts in my inbox takes my mind in important directions. My reading and research have been expanded.
3 – My contributions beyond posting includes bringing new bloggers to WordPress and artists into other groups I have joined online. I have been able to share my art with all of you.
4 – Learning is, I believe, a lifelong task. This journey has sometimes made me feel like there is too much to take in. Writing is a way to organize my thoughts. The posts are small teachable moments to share. There is still so much to learn to improve the blog.
5 – The challenge is to continue to stay involved in this growing community even when personal issues press. My followers have been caring and concerned as if we meet regularly. What a club we have joined!

Many Thanks and Welcome to Year Two.

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Abstract digital art

Green Hat with Embellishments

Hat Lady Series

The first and third images are related by color and yet they are very different. The middle image resulted from digital art.The Hat Lady drawing is embellished with crystals and feathers. Each is individually drawn. The style of hat is imagined by the face and shape of the woman’s head. Each ‘hat’ is designed much as a hat might be selected in a shop.

They say a person almost never wears a hat placed by someone else without making an adjustment. It might be shifted over one eye, ever slightly. Or pushed to feel more secure. The hat might even be removed and replaced. While there are fewer occasions for wearing a hat, it is still very personal.

Years ago, when I was more actively setting up tables to sell my paintings, I was intrigued by the Church Women’s Convention held in Nashville. All day couples, (a man and a woman), crossed the street to enter a department store. Soon after they would return, the man carrying a number of large hat boxes.

I learned that the ‘store’ inside the convention center brought together the most famous hat designers to sell their wares. It was not easy but I got an invitation to visit these designers and to see what they were currently making. They shared some of the history of this denomination headquartered in Memphis, TN.

Soon I went to Memphis and met Ernest Withers, a famous Civil Rights photographer. He had been the organizations official photographer for 20 years. He had so many photographs showing the styles and changes in an industry little studied. My grandiose idea was that I would use his photographs to paint women in these hats and to comment on the history of the hats and why they are worn by church women. A damper resulted from the cost! I bought what I thought I could afford and got his permission to use them.

One of the paintings is ‘From My Lips to God’s Ear.’ I never finished a complete series nor wrote the history I had planned. And then a friend gave me Crowns: Portraits of Black Women in Church Hats by Michael Cunningham. If you wait long enough someone will have the same idea and act on it.

Even though I have been working on a series of historic women, it is easy to get diverted. The pen and ink hat ladies (5×7) are available as cards and prints:                     (http://bettye-harwell.artistwebsites.com).

Adding the embellishments has been a fun way to regroup and take care of ‘important’ work. Many suggestions have come from friends to expand from hats to… One was ballerinas. The first (above) is a cut-out from recycled paper. (I use left over paint by covering my palette with paper. My intention is always to return before it dries. At a minimum, it keeps anyone from accidentally getting the paint on their clothes. These colored papers can be used in collage and other art projects.)

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