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Archive for the ‘Civil War’ Category

Now, at 90, my place in family history
I am the oldest living man or woman in my family. It has been the women living, triumphantly, out living their men and some children. The loss of children is unbearable. Now that I have lost my son, I grieve in silence as my aunt must have. And for those children unborn.

The women on my mother’s side were those who have aged the best. Grancy holds the prize. At 100 plus she survived slavery, segregation, birthing thirteen known children and everything in between. She was born Adeline in NC about 1833. Her mother may have been Portia and her father a Crump. They were slaves of the Crump family. When Adeline was 5, they were transported to a plantation in Holly Springs, MS. 
Her first child, Josephine, was fathered by a Crump when Adeline was 13. A total of 8 children were born before Grancy was loaned to Ephraim Talbot. He and his brother, Francis, had moved to Holly Springs from MA in 1840 to open pharmacies. Ephraim’s wife died leaving him with two young boys.
Grancy was rented, probably to live in and care for the sons. Her daughter Josephine had ben living with the William Strickland family since age 9. He was a prominent lawyer, no relation to my gradfather. There she was the nurse maid to their infant daughter, Perle.
Four children were fathered, born while Grancy lived with the Talbots: Victor (1860),Annie (1862), Adeline and William.
These four youngest children were educated at Rust College paid for by their father? Ephraim. Grancy had big responsibilities as Ephraim also ran a pharmmacy in Memphis, TN. He spent a great deal of time there running Talbot and Yates pharmacy and his slave holdings. Grancy managed the the household and his slaves in Holly Springs.
As the Civil War heated up and Memphis businesses were in danger, Ephraim returned to MS and two of Grancy’s children were born as the war ended.
My grandmother, Annie Talbot, became a school teacher at 18. She married my grandfather when they both graduated from Rust College. Annie took her mother everywhere she lived. In Little Rock, AR, El Paso and Houston, TX, Wilberforce, OH where she taught in colleges, and finally Detroit, MI.
Annie and William Strickland married when they both graduated from Rusr College. While my grandfather studied medicine at Meharry Medical College in Nashville, the family lived in Little Rock, AR where my grandmother taught in high schools and colleges. My mother Velma and Aunt Unita taught school also.

I ssay Grancy lived longer than any other family member because records were not kept at the time to clearly state births. The names of Crump slaves were recorded on arrival in MS. Grancy herself said she remembered 100 years and the presidents who served in her lifetime. 

Unita lived to be 101 as active then as ever. She worked for the government in Detroit. She followed the tradition of caring for her mother until her death. My great aunt, Adeline (Aunt Addie) Morris lived to be 92. She taught at Rust College and was a political powerhouse in KC, KS.

And now it is a puzzle to be resolved in the future. The statistics for me are good. I never was a smoker. I did not drink alcohol until my late forties and I have an active, quirky mind. So, will it be the tortoise or the hare?

Sent from my iPad

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Women Series

Iola (Ida B. Wells)
Oil by Bettye W. Harwell

Definition:
Lynching is the act of hanging an individual by a group.

I may not post this because this is my personal opinion.  I want to write this for my own clarity. Lynching was never something I came into personal contact with. Living in the North with southern-raised relatives, children were protected from scary things. Still there were the conversations in the corners which made us fearful.

As I became an adult, I came to know about the practice of killing Black men for any reason. These were spontaneously organized by groups of men. No judge, no jury. We are familiar with the Ku Klux Clan formed after the Civil War. By wearing a covering of white, each person remained anonymous. Burning crosses, shooting into homes, culminating with hanging spectacles terrorized communities across the country.

Earlier, the Wild West set the template of justice. Those early hangings, viewed by women and children, were public events. The Law and Order of an earlier day was horrible but at least the hangings were equal opportunity. Lynching became racial and intimidation events. Officials were not acting in their authority but were part of the mob.

These unexpected and unsanctioned attacks deprived families of breadwinners, caused loss of property. They were used to ensure that others knew their ‘place.’ It also caused displacement: Blacks fled their homes looking for safe shelter far away from the dangers. (Finding dangers of another kind?)

Long before Emmit Till, part of my family left the south in small  groups. A great uncle, age 20 and looking white, was being chased for talking to a white woman. The sister was separated from her brother. His former slave mother spent her last years without his comfort. The doctor husband remained in a nearby southern state. What resulted from this new normal?

Finally, the practice of lynching was curtailed by federal laws.

But now we have a new version of lawlessness. Our children are killing each other. In this form, it is also an equal opportunity event. Children of color, with guns, kill those closest to themselves. It is the lawlessness of the Wild West and no one is safe.

By my definition the New Lynchings are encouraged by our laws. It is an individual ‘being the MAN’ event. When there is no accountability for taking a life, our children have no expectation of living a long time. The model is ‘give me respect’, or, with my gun, you lose your life. How sad. Parents live in anguish when cast as polite, understanding people; cast into the TV limelight due to the killing of their child. What effort to face the public with the approved image only to curse the dark when alone.

And if you have other children, yours or your neighbors?  What court? What jury? What comfort for their safety? What price for raising good kids? And if not so good, would that make a killing justified?

In the celebration of Black History Month, we look away from the bad past and the bad today. Will we remember that within some of our lifetimes, in Florida, Blacks had a curfew, could not walk on the sidewalk, and could be arrested without a ‘passport.’ Not slavery times, not too long ago. Will we see the signs on water fountains because some people buy into being separate means safety?

Who knew?

I used to say (facetiously) that you had lived a good life if your son did not ring the doorbell and shoot you. (That happened in our town.) Now you may have to live to bury your child. This is my opinion, but it does not change anything today. Perhaps tomorrow.

Painting: Ida Wells became a civil right leader after learning of the lynching  of three Black men in TN.

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English: Abraham Lincoln, the sixteenth Presid...

English: Abraham Lincoln, the sixteenth President of the United States. Latviešu: Abrahams Linkolns, sešpadsmitais ASV prezidents. Српски / Srpski: Абрахам Линколн, шеснаести председник Сједињених Америчких Држава. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Emancipation Proclamation fetches $2.1 million at auction

Emancipation Proclamation original copy, signed by Abraham Lincoln,  sold at a New York auction for $2.1 million Wednesday. It’s onlt the second highest priced Emancipation Proclamation copy.

By Verena Dobnik, Associated Press / June 29, 2012

This undated photo provided by Seth Kaller, Inc., shows a detail from the rare original copy of President Abraham Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation which sold Tuesday, June 26, 2012, at a New York auction for more than $2 million. It’s the second-highest price ever paid for a Lincoln-signed proclamation – after one owned by the late Sen. Robert Kennedy that went for $3.8 million two years ago.

Seth Kaller/AP/File

 New York

A rare original copy of President Abraham Lincoln‘s Emancipation Proclamation ordering the freeing of slaves sold Tuesday at a New York auction for more than $2 million. It’s the second-highest price ever paid for a Lincoln-signed proclamation — after one owned by the late Sen. Robert Kennedy that went for $3.8 million two years ago.

The latest copy of the 1863 document, which was auctioned at the Robert Siegel Auction Galleries, went to David Rubenstein, managing director of The Carlyle Group investment firm. The American seller remained anonymous.

The $2.1 million purchase price includes a buyer’s premium.

This price and the one for the Kennedy copy are the highest ever paid for the proclamation, reflecting a “growing appreciation for documents that capture the most important moments in our history,” said Seth Kaller, a dealer in American historic documents and expert on the Emancipation Proclamation; he’s handled eight signed copies.

The document will go on public exhibit somewhere in Washington, he said. The name of the institution is yet to be announced.

Lincoln signed the proclamation during the Civil War, freeing all slaves in states then in rebellion. The proclamation also provided a legal framework for the emancipation of millions of other slaves as the Union armies advanced.

Forty-eight copies were subsequently printed, with Lincoln signing all of them.

The president donated them to the so-called Sanitary Commission, a precursor of the modern Red Cross that sold the documents privately to provide medical care to Union soldiers.

A century later, President Lyndon Johnson invoked the proclamation while presenting the Voting Rights Act to Congress. He said equality was still an unfulfilled promise for black Americans.

A total of nine proclamation copies have been sold publicly in the past 40 years, Kaller said.

In 2010, Robert Kennedy’s family auctioned his copy for $3.8 million at Sotheby’s. Kennedy, who was assassinated in 1968, had purchased it for $9,500 in 1964, when he was U.S. attorney general.

Only about half of the 48 proclamation copies have survived, Kaller said.

English: Black man reading newspaper by candle...A watercolor painting from Zemanta.

Who knew?
Did you know how many copies were made and signed by President Lincoln?
Why were they sold? What was the difference in the price then and the auction price in 2012?
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Stacy Schiff, author of a new biography about ...

Image via Wikipedia

To Do Lists

There are days when nothing seems pressing enough to do. Each list repeats others with the same urgencies. Weekends and rainy days offer excuses for taking time out.

These times can occur when you are on emotional or physical overload. (more…)

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George B. McClellan. Library of Congress descr...

Serendipity
After writing the November 2 post on John Brown, an email from flag3  featured for November:

The Battle of Tippecanoe:

Prelude to the War of 1812

In the sidebar was the following:
On November 1, 1861, President Lincoln promoted General George B. McClellan to general-in-chief, commander of all Union armies. About that time, McClellan had assembled a large number of troops around Washington, DC, to protect the capital, which was surrounded by  Confederate forces. (more…)

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The New York Times printed this article and a picture of Tomas Transtromer, Nobel Prize winner for Literature (10/7/2011). This honor was a big deal but he seemed humble.

http://wp.me/p1P35l-7a
(more…)

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Going to Colorado Springs, CO

In 1953, Colorado Springs was a pretty little town. Fort Carson was Camp Carson. Just before you entered the army post, a right turn took you up the mountain to Helen Hunt Falls. Halfway up, a left turn took you on a tiny road past the Crumpacker home to the Biltmore Hotel. You might have seen a six year old’s horse roaming on someone’s front lawn. There was no Air Force Academy in the city. Government security was hidden.

But the moment of inspiration was seeing the Garden of the Gods on the other side of town. The more we change things, the more the beauty of our country is needed to stay the same. Images found on google.com bring back memories of what now seems like an uncomplicated time.

http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&client=safari&tbo=d&tbm=isch&q=garden+of+the+gods+colorado&revid=798793620&sa=X&ei=cLNwTvvOIePX0QG6t-HwCQ&ved=0CC8Q1QIoAg&biw=1024&bih=660

Who knew?
Today Tennessee State Libraries and Archives (TSLA) has announced a collection of Civil War letters now available. These were written by the white officers who led black troops and what they did after the war. Most are familiar with the movie ‘Glory.’ We continue to educate ourselves about our history and heroes.

http://www.tennessean.com/article/20110914/NEWS01/309130050/1969/NEWS

Note: The Juggler, posted yesterday, appeared in the WordPress ART category. It may be a fleeting appearance but appreciated.

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